Fascinating

Geraldine Hamilton demonstrates how scientists can implant living human cells into microchips that mimic the body’s conditions. These “organs-on-a-chip” can be used to study drug toxicity, and identify potential new therapies.
Backed by stunning illustrations, David Christian narrates a complete history of the universe, from the Big Bang to the Internet, in a riveting 18 minutes. This is “Big History”: an enlightening, wide-angle look at complexity, life and humanity, set against our slim share of the cosmic timeline.

Hugh Herr is building the next generation of bionic limbs, robotic prosthetics inspired by nature’s own designs. Herr lost both legs in a climbing accident 30 years ago; now, as the head of the MIT Media Lab’s Biomechatronics group, he shows his incredible technology in a talk that’s both technical and deeply personal
Deb Roy wanted to understand how his infant son learned language — so he wired up his house with videocameras to catch every moment of his son’s life. Astonishing, data-rich research with deep implications for how we learn.
When Sue Austin got a power chair 16 years ago, she felt a tremendous sense of freedom — yet others looked at her as though she had lost something. In her art, she aims to convey the spirit of wonder she feels wheeling through the world.
As the Director and head coach of the Soccer team at Ryerson University, Dr. Joseph is often asked what skills he is searching for as a recruiter. He explores self confidence and how it is not just the most important skill in athletics, but in our lives.

Informative

Google CEO Larry Page talks about his far-off vision for the company. It includes aerial bikeways and internet balloons … and then it gets even more interesting, as Page talks through the company’s recent acquisition of Deep Mind.
Yes, some hackers are bad guys, but many are working to fight government corruption and advocate for our rights. By exposing vulnerabilities, they push the Internet to become stronger, wielding their power to create a better world.
The right to data privacy, Edward Snowdon suggests, is not a partisan issue, it requires a rethink of the role of internet in our lives and laws that protect it. “Your rights matter,” he says, “because you never know when you’re going to need them.”
You think your wireless and other technology is safe? From Blue Tooth to automobile remotes, PCs, and “secure” credit cards, Hacker extraordinaire shows how nearly every secure system is vulnerable.
Author of ‘The Personal MBA: Master the Art of Business’. Josh Kaufman specializes in teaching people how to master practical knowledge and skills. In his talk, he shares how having his first child inspired him to approach learning in a whole new way.
“Work-life balance is too important to be left in the hands of your employer.” At TEDxSydney, Marsh lays out an ideal day balanced between family time, personal time and productivity — and offers some stirring encouragement to make it happen.
Social psychologist Amy Cuddy shows how standing in a posture of confidence, even when we don’t feel confident — can affect testosterone and cortisol levels in the brain, and might even have an impact on our chances for success.
Contrary to popular belief, your 20s are not a throwaway decade. In this provocative talk, Meg Jay says that just because marriage, work and kids are happening later in life, doesn’t mean you can’t start planning now.
The founder of PayPal, Tesla Motors and SpaceX sits down with TED curator Chris Anderson to share details about his visionary projects, which include a mass-marketed electric car, a solar energy leasing company and a fully reusable rocket.

Inspirational

Bill and Melinda Gates talk to Chris Anderson about their work at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, as well as their marriage, their children, their failures and the satisfaction of giving most of their wealth away.
At her first museum job, Sarah Lewis noticed something important about an artist she was studying: Not every artwork was a total masterpiece. She considers the role of the near win in our lives and in the pursuit of success.
Within each of us are two selves, suggests David Brooks in this short talk: that which craves success, who builds a résumé, and the other who seeks connection, community, love — values that make for a great eulogy. Can we balance these two selves?
In a world of too many options and too little time, our obvious choice is to just ignore the ordinary stuff. Marketing guru Seth Godin spells out why, when it comes to getting our attention, bad or bizarre ideas are more successful than boring ones.
Scott Dinsmore’s demoralizing experience at a Fortune 500 job launched his quest to understand why 80% of adults hate the work they do, and more importantly, to identify what the other 20% were doing differently.
Simon Sinek presents a simple but powerful model for how leaders inspire action, starting with a golden circle and the question “Why?” His examples include Apple, Martin Luther King, and the Wright brothers.
In this quietly moving talk, writer Andrew Solomon shares what he learned from talking to dozens of parents — asking them: What’s the line between unconditional love and unconditional acceptance?
Rita Pierson, a teacher for 40 years, gives a rousing call to educators to believe in their students and actually connect with them on a real, human, personal level. You’ll want to watch this one again & again.
Larry Smith has inspired legions of students to take up the mantle of economics with his passionate and homespun tales of economic wizardry. He is a renowned story-teller, teacher and youth leadership champion.